RESEARCH ARTICLE: Pharmacy students’ perceptions and attitudes towards professionalism on social media: A cross-sectional study

Authors

  • Mansour Almetwazi College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4768-1838
  • Ghaida Alahmari College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia
  • Nada Alnahdi King Khalid University Hospital, King Saud University-Medical City, Saudi Arabia
  • Fatemah Aljamil College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia
  • Mohammad Aljawadi College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia
  • Abdulaziz Alhossan College of Pharmacy, King Saud University & King Khalid University Hospital, King Saud University-Medical City, Saudi Arabia

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.46542/pe.2021.211.222229

Keywords:

Gender, Programme years, Pharmacy, Professionalism, Social media

Abstract

Background: The objective of the study was to determine the perceptions and attitudes toward social media professionalism among pharmacy students according to gender and program year.   

Methods: An online survey was sent to pharmacy students. The survey contained two sections: a demographics section, and assessment of attitudes toward professionalism and accountability in using social media.    

Results: About 30% of female students disagreed on using social media for hiring decisions compared to 20% of male students. About 41% of female students agreed on the importance of editing social media profiles prior to applying for jobs, compared to 38% of male students. Male students (11%) agreed more than female students (4%) on taking pictures of others without their knowledge. Fifth-year students (85%) disagreed the most on posting descriptions of how to break school or job rules.   

Conclusion: Gender and program years have impacted the perceptions and attitudes toward social media professionalism.

Author Biographies

Mansour Almetwazi, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia

Department of Clinical Pharmacy

Ghaida Alahmari, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia

Department of Clinical Pharmacy

Nada Alnahdi, King Khalid University Hospital, King Saud University-Medical City, Saudi Arabia

Department of Pharmacy Services

Fatemah Aljamil, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia

Department of Clinical Pharmacy

Mohammad Aljawadi, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia

Department of Clinical Pharmacy

Abdulaziz Alhossan, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University & King Khalid University Hospital, King Saud University-Medical City, Saudi Arabia

Department of Clinical Pharmacy & Department of Pharmacy Services

References

Alsuraihi, A. K., Almaqati, A. S., Abughanim, S. A., & Jastaniah, N. A. (2016). Use of social media in education among medical students in Saudi Arabia. Korean Journal of medical education, 28(4), 343-3. https://doi.org/10.3946/kjme.2016.40

Bahkali, S., Alfurih, S., Aldremly, M., Alzayyat, M., Alsurimi, K., & Househ, M. (2016). The prevalence of internet and social media based medication information seeking behavior in Saudi Arabia. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, 226, 275–278. https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-61499-664-4-275

Barnable, A., Cunning, G., & Parcon, M. (2018). Nursing Students’ Perceptions of Confidentiality, Accountability, and E-Professionalism in Relation to Facebook. Nurse Educator, 43(1), 28–31. https://doi.org/10.1097/NNE.0000000000000441

Bongartz, J., Vang, C., Havrda, D., Fravel, M., McDanel, D., & Farris, K. B. (2011). Student pharmacist, pharmacy resident, and graduate student perceptions of social interactions with faculty members. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 75(9), 180. https://doi.org/10.5688/ajpe759180

Cain, J., Scott, D. R., & Akers, P. (2009). Pharmacy students’ facebook activity and opinions regarding accountability and e-professionalism. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 73(6). https://doi.org/10.5688/aj7306104

Chisholm-burns, M. A., Spivey, C. A., Jaeger, M. C., Williams, J., & George, C. (2017). Development of an Instrument to Measure Pharmacy Student Attitudes Toward Social Media Professionalism. American journal of pharmaceutical education, 81(4), 65. https://doi.org/10.5688/ajpe81465

Fan, W., & Yan, Z. (2010). Computers in Human Behavior Factors affecting response rates of the web survey : A systematic review. Computers in Human Behavior, 26(2), 132–139. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2009.10.015

Gettig, J. P., Lee, N., & Fjortoft, N. (2013). Student and faculty observations and perceptions of professionalism in online domain scenarios. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 77(9). https://doi.org/10.5688/ajpe779192

Hall, M., Hanna, L.-A., & Huey, G. (2013). Use and Views on Social Networking Sites of Pharmacy Students in the United Kingdom. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 77(1), 9. https://doi.org/10.5688/ajpe7719

Kedrowicz, A. A., Royal, K., & Flammer, K. (2016). Social media and impression management: Veterinary Medicine students’ and faculty members’ attitudes toward the acceptability of social media posts. Journal of Advances in Medical Education & Professionalism, 4(4), 155–162

Kemp, S. (2018). DIGITAL 2018: SAUDI ARABIA. Global overview. We are social. Hootsuite. Available at: https://datareportal.com/reports/digital-2018-saudi-arabia

Kemp, S. (2019). DIGITAL 2019: SAUDI ARABIA. Global overview. We are social. Hootsuite. Available at: https://datareportal.com/reports/digital-2019-saudi-arabia

Kogan, L. R., Hellyer, P. W., Stewart, S. M., & Dowers, K. L. (2015). Recruitment and Hiring Strategies of Private Practitioners and Implications for Practice Management Training of Veterinary Students. Journal of Veterinary Medical Education, 42(2), 107–111. https://doi.org/10.3138/jvme.0814-085R

Communications & PR Manager. (2016). Student Social Media Policy. Available at: http://www.ulster.ac.uk/secretary/policyimplementation/policies/secretary.html

Ness, G. L., Sheehan, A. H., & Snyder, M. E. (2014). Graduating student pharmacists’ perspectives on e-professionalism and social media. Journal of the American Pharmacists Association, 54(2), 138–143. https://doi.org/10.1331/JAPhA.2014.13188

Rocha, P. N., & De Castro, N. A. A. (2014). Opinions of students from a Brazilian medical school regarding online professionalism. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 29(5), 758–764. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-013-2748-y

Sowton, C., Connelly, L., & Osborne, N. (2016). e-Professionalism. Institute for Academic Development, University of Edinburgh, 1.2. Available at: http://www.docs.hss.ed.ac.uk/iad/About_us/Digital_footprint/Student_eprofrofessionalism_guide_v1_2.pdf

The Official Gazette, (Um Al Qura). Anti-cyber crime law (2007). Riyadh, Saudi Arabia: Communications and Information Technology Commission. Available at: www.citc.gov.sa

Ward, R. (2018). Student Social Media Policy, De Montfort University. Available at: https://www.dmu.ac.uk/documents/dmu-students/academic-support-office/student-social-media-policy-2018.pdf

White, J., Kirwan, P., Lai, K., Walton, J., & Ross, S. (2013). ‘ Have you seen what is on Facebook ? ’ The use of social networking software by healthcare professions students, 1–8. BMJ open, 3(7), e003013. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003013

Published

11/07/2021

Issue

Section

Research Article