RESEARCH ARTICLE: Assessing the impact of a journal club elective on literature evaluation performance

Authors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.46542/pe.2021.211.356361

Keywords:

elective, journal club, literature evaluation

Abstract

Introduction: The study assessed the impact of a journal club (JC) elective on literature evaluation performance during the first three advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPE).   

Methods: Students who took a JC elective were compared to students who did not take the JC elective in regards to scores on APPE JC and overall APPE literature evaluation.   

Results: Of 186 eligible participants, 22 participants completed the JC elective. APPE JC and APPE literature evaluation scores were similar between groups. First semester APPE JC scores were positively correlated with scores earned in the JC elective (r=0.452, p=0.045).   

Conclusions: Students in the elective did not have significantly different APPE JC scores compared to students who did not take the elective; however, there was a correlation and potential predictive association to APPE JC scores. The JC elective may identify students at risk of lower performance during APPEs so that they may receive additional support.

Author Biographies

Dawn M. Battise, Wingate University School of Pharmacy, Wingate, North Carolina, USA

Associate Professor of Pharmacy

Susan Bates, Wingate University School of Pharmacy, Wingate, North Carolina, USA

  

Sarah A. Nisly, Wingate University School of Pharmacy, Wingate, North Carolina, USA

Professor of Pharmacy

 

References

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Published

11/08/2021

Issue

Section

Research Article