Prevalence and roles of vice-chairs in schools and colleges of pharmacy

Authors

  • Joycelyn Yamzon University College of Pharmacy, United States
  • David Q Pham Western University of Health Sciences College of Pharmacy, United States
  • Karl Hess Chapman University School of Pharmacy, United States

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.46542/pe.2022.221.100107

Keywords:

Faculty mentorship, Faculty development, Vice chair

Abstract

Introduction: The activities and roles of vice-chairs (VC) in academic medicine are described in the literature but are not presently known in academic pharmacy.   

Aim: The objectives of this pilot study were to determine the prevalence of VC, describe the roles and responsibilities of VC in various departments, and evaluate why some institutions may not have VC.   

Methods: A Qualtrics survey was sent to all pharmacy school Deans from October to November 2018. Survey results were analysed using qualitative and quantitative methods.   

Results: Based on the 49.6% response rate, the overall prevalence of VC was estimated to be 41%. The primary reason for VC was to support the department chair and responsibilities included faculty mentorship, development, and evaluations. Fifty-five per cent of those without VC stated the position was not perceived as needed.   

Conclusion: VC are not widely utilised by pharmacy schools. For institutions considering VC, they may help offset the department chair’s workload.

Author Biographies

Joycelyn Yamzon, University College of Pharmacy, United States

Marshall B. Ketchum

David Q Pham, Western University of Health Sciences College of Pharmacy, United States

  

Karl Hess, Chapman University School of Pharmacy, United States

  

References

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Published

2022-02-02

How to Cite

Yamzon, J., Pham, D. Q., & Hess, K. (2022). Prevalence and roles of vice-chairs in schools and colleges of pharmacy. Pharmacy Education, 22(1), p. 100–107. https://doi.org/10.46542/pe.2022.221.100107

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Section

Research Article