RESEARCH ARTICLE: Structured incremental measurement of directed and objective simulation experiences-pilot (SIM DOSE-P)

Authors

  • Michael C. Thomas Samford University, Birmingham, Alabama, United States
  • Georges Adunlin Samford University, Birmingham, Alabama, United States
  • Megan Z. Roberts Samford University, Birmingham, Alabama, United States
  • Jennifer W. Beall Samford University, Birmingham, Alabama, United States
  • Elizabeth W. Covington Samford University, Birmingham, Alabama, United States
  • Mary A. Worthington Samford University, Birmingham, Alabama, United States
  • Jeffrey A. Kyle Samford University, Birmingham, Alabama, United States

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.46542/pe.2022.221.276286

Keywords:

High-fidelity, Patient simulation, Pharmacy education

Abstract

Objective: To describe performance, anxiety, confidence, and time effects across multiple individual simulation experiences in an acute care environment among volunteer Pharm.D. students.        

Methods: This pilot study used five different cases spanning five weeks.  Participants were not aware of case content until each simulation began but topics had been taught in the curriculum. Performance on a SOAP note, self-reported anxiety and confidence, and time to complete each activity were measured. A focus group provided qualitative feedback.   

Results: Fifteen participants completed the study. Mean performance scores across all cases were variable without a predictable pattern. Global measures of anxiety and confidence numerically improved. The average time to complete simulation activities was similar across the first three cases but decreased for the remaining two cases. Participant comments supported the overall design as meaningful and encouraged self-directed learning.     

Conclusion: The design of repeated individual simulation experiences improves anxiety and confidence scores and promotes self-directed learning.

Author Biographies

Michael C. Thomas, Samford University, Birmingham, Alabama, United States

McWhorter School of Pharmacy

Georges Adunlin, Samford University, Birmingham, Alabama, United States

McWhorter School of Pharmacy

Megan Z. Roberts, Samford University, Birmingham, Alabama, United States

McWhorter School of Pharmacy

Jennifer W. Beall, Samford University, Birmingham, Alabama, United States

McWhorter School of Pharmacy

Elizabeth W. Covington, Samford University, Birmingham, Alabama, United States

McWhorter School of Pharmacy

Mary A. Worthington, Samford University, Birmingham, Alabama, United States

McWhorter School of Pharmacy

Jeffrey A. Kyle, Samford University, Birmingham, Alabama, United States

McWhorter School of Pharmacy

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Published

2022-04-08

How to Cite

Thomas, M. C. ., Adunlin, G. ., Roberts, M. Z. ., Beall, J. W. ., Covington, E. W. ., Worthington, M. A. ., & Kyle, J. A. . (2022). RESEARCH ARTICLE: Structured incremental measurement of directed and objective simulation experiences-pilot (SIM DOSE-P). Pharmacy Education, 22(1), p. 276–286. https://doi.org/10.46542/pe.2022.221.276286

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Research Article