Supplemental instruction in pharmacy education: Lessons learned from collected perceptions

Authors

  • Sarah P. Collier Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, United States https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8102-3604
  • Kayce D. Gill Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, United States & Vanderbilt University, United States https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9680-9490
  • Stephen D. Phipps Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, United States & Liberty University College of Osteopathic Medicine, United States https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5897-4487
  • Susan L. Mercer Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, United States & Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc., United States

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.46542/pe.2022.221.620628

Keywords:

Peer-assisted learning, Peer tutoring, Pharmacy education, Student success, Supplemental instruction

Abstract

Introduction: Supplemental Instruction (SI) is an internationally-recognised academic support programme serving students in historically challenging courses across higher education via peer-assisted learning.   

Methods: A survey was deployed to gather perceptions of SI among student pharmacists, near-peer leaders, faculty, and staff of a traditional, four-year doctor of pharmacy programme hosted by a private institution in the United States.   

Results: Ninety-eight participants shared perceptions and viewpoints of the SI programme. Overall, positive perceptions were expressed and were independent of proximity to either attending sessions (students) or teaching activities (faculty). Student respondents identified audience-response polling or “gamification” as the most effective modality while the traditional use of student small groups was deemed less useful. Curiously, the student results also support SI improving student-faculty interactions.   

Conclusion: Given the current landscape of pharmacy education, it is critical to provide the best resources possible to ensure student success, and SI is an easily adaptable model to support student pharmacists.

Author Biographies

Sarah P. Collier, Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, United States

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences & Department of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Kayce D. Gill, Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, United States & Vanderbilt University, United States

Annette and Irwin Eskind Family Biomedical Library and Learning Center

Stephen D. Phipps, Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, United States & Liberty University College of Osteopathic Medicine, United States

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences & Department of Integrative Physiology and Pharmacology

Susan L. Mercer, Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, United States & Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc., United States

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences & United States Medical Affairs - Neurology

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Published

2022-06-24

How to Cite

Collier, S. P., Gill, K. D., Phipps, S. D., & Mercer, S. L. (2022). Supplemental instruction in pharmacy education: Lessons learned from collected perceptions . Pharmacy Education, 22(1), p. 620–628. https://doi.org/10.46542/pe.2022.221.620628

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Section

Research Article