Agreement of medicine and pharmacy students on quality of drug information

Authors

  • Seeba Zachariah Gulf Medical University, Ajman, United Arab Emirates https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2568-0244
  • Dixon Thomas Gulf Medical University, Ajman, United Arab Emirates
  • Farhanah Mohamed Gulf Medical University, Ajman, United Arab Emirates
  • Muhsina Chiraparambil Gulf Medical University, Ajman, United Arab Emirates
  • Aadith Soorya Gulf Medical University, Ajman, United Arab Emirates
  • Affana Parveen Gulf Medical University, Ajman, United Arab Emirates
  • Baljinder Singh Gulf Medical University, Ajman, United Arab Emirates
  • Aji Gopakumar Emirates Health Services, United Arab Emirates
  • Danial Baker Washington State University, United States

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.46542/pe.2022.221.771777

Keywords:

Drug information , Interprofessional, Quality assessment

Abstract

Objective: Drug information responses are usually given by pharmacists to physicians. These responses are intended to improve interprofessional care and patient outcomes. This study was conducted to assess if medicine and pharmacy students agree on the quality of drug information responses.   

Methods: All patient or population-specific responses created in 2021 by the pharmacy students during their final year drug information rotation at Thumbay University Hospital, United Arab Emirates were evaluated by three pharmacy students and a medical student of the next cohort. In 2021, a total of 148 patient or population-focused drug information responses were prepared. A content-validated assessment rubric with seven elements was used to assess each drug information response in 2022. SPSS version 26 was used to assess agreement between pharmacy and medicine students using Kappa statistics.   

Results: Quality of drug information was rated high (very much and rather much combined) by pharmacy and medicine students in a range of 61% to 90% for all quality elements. The same ratings of medicine and pharmacy students (agreement) were observed at more than 50% only for three quality elements between two pharmacy students with the medical student. Poor agreement exists between medicine and pharmacy students on their rating of the quality of drug information (Kappa <0.7). Some of these kappa coefficients had a p-value less than 0.05.   

Conclusion: Both medicine and pharmacy students rated drug information reports as of reasonable quality, but their agreements were poor on the quality of drug information. It shows the need for interprofessional education in experiential learning. Agreement on quality of drug information responses improved after the students completed an interprofessional drug information task. The authors recommend a full drug information rotation of medicine and pharmacy students.

Author Biographies

Seeba Zachariah, Gulf Medical University, Ajman, United Arab Emirates

College of Pharmacy

Dixon Thomas, Gulf Medical University, Ajman, United Arab Emirates

College of Pharmacy

Farhanah Mohamed, Gulf Medical University, Ajman, United Arab Emirates

College of Pharmacy

Muhsina Chiraparambil, Gulf Medical University, Ajman, United Arab Emirates

College of Pharmacy

Aadith Soorya, Gulf Medical University, Ajman, United Arab Emirates

College of Medicine

Affana Parveen, Gulf Medical University, Ajman, United Arab Emirates

College of Pharmacy

Baljinder Singh, Gulf Medical University, Ajman, United Arab Emirates

College of Medicine

Aji Gopakumar, Emirates Health Services, United Arab Emirates

Department of Research

Danial Baker, Washington State University, United States

College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

References

Al Hussain, S., Sarsour, A., & Zaitoun, M. (2021). Assessment of drug information skills and resources utilisation among pharmacy students: A cross-sectional study. Pharmacy Education, 21, p. 690–694. https://doi.org/10.46542/pe.2021.211.690694

Albassam, A., Almohammed, H., Alhujaili, M., Koshy, S., & Awad, A. (2020). Perspectives of primary care physicians and pharmacists on interprofessional collaboration in Kuwait: A quantitative study. PloS one, 15(7), e0236114. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0236114

Allan, G.M., Lexchin, J., & Wiebe, N. (2007). Physician awareness of drug cost: a systematic review. PLoS medicine, 4(9), 1486-1496

AlNasser, S.N., Khojah, N., & AlQahtani, S.A. (2019). Assessment of drug and poison information centers in Saudi Arabia. Toxicology Communications, 3(1), 43-46, https://doi.org/10.1080/24734306.2019.1624410

Amundstuen Reppe, L., Spigset, O., & Schjøtt, J. (2016). Drug Information Services Today: Current Role and Future Perspectives in Rational Drug Therapy. Clinical therapeutics, 38(2), 414–421. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinthera.2015.12.019

Bautista, C.A., Huang, I., Stebbins, M., Floren, L.C., Wamsley, M., Youmans, S.L., & Hsia, S.L. (2020). Development of an interprofessional rotation for pharmacy and medical students to perform telehealth outreach to vulnerable patients in the COVID-19 pandemic. Journal of interprofessional care, 34(5), 694–697. https://doi.org/10.1080/13561820.2020.1807920

Dixon, J. (2021). Improving the quality of care in health systems: towards better strategies. Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, 10. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13584-021-00448-y

Formoso, G., Rizzini, P., Bassi, M., Bonfanti, P., Rizzardini, G., Campomori, A., & Mosconi, P. (2016). Knowledge transfer: what drug information would specialist doctors need to support their clinical practice? Results of a survey and of three focus groups in Italy. BMC medical informatics and decision making, 16(1), 115. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12911-016-0355-7

Green, B.N., & Johnson, C.D. (2015). Interprofessional collaboration in research, education, and clinical practice: working together for a better future. The Journal of chiropractic education, 29(1), 1–10. https://doi.org/10.7899/JCE-14-36

Harish, C., Belavigi, D., Patil, A.N., Pattanaik, S., Kakkar, A., & Kasudhan, K.S. (2021). Assessment of the Impact of Clinical Pharmacology Consultations Provided to Hospital Clinicians From the Drug Information Center-An Outcome Research in a Developing Country. Journal of pharmacy practice, 34(4), 581–586. https://doi.org/10.1177/0897190019885256

Jebara, T., Thomas, I., Cunningham, S., & Rushworth, G.F. (2022). Pharmacy and medical student interprofessional education placement week. The clinical teacher, 19(2), 143–149. https://doi.org/10.1111/tct.13450

Kelly, D.V., Bishop, L., Young, S., Hawboldt, J., Phillips, L., & Keough, T.M. (2013). Pharmacist and physician views on collaborative practice: Findings from the community pharmaceutical care project. Canadian pharmacists journal, 146(4), 218–226. https://doi.org/10.1177/1715163513492642

Kim, J., Hoover, R., Perkins, S., & Advani, A. (2020). Development of a Drug Information Service Collaborative in Academia. The Annals of pharmacotherapy, 54(3), 287–289. https://doi.org/10.1177/1060028019884079

Malone, P.M., Witt, B.A., Malone, M.J., & Peterson, D.M. eds. Drug Information: A Guide for Pharmacists, 7e. McGraw Hill; 2022. Available at: https://accesspharmacy.mhmedical.com/content.aspx?bookid=3132&sectionid=262747038

Patel, K., Desai, U., & Paladine, H. (2018). Development and implementation of an interprofessional pharmacotherapy learning experience during an advanced pharmacy practice rotation in primary care. Currents in pharmacy teaching & learning, 10(7), 990–995. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cptl.2018.04.014

Reichert, S., Simon, T., & Halm, E.A. (2000). Physicians' attitudes about prescribing and knowledge of the costs of common medications. Archives of Internal medicine, 160(18), 2799-2803. https://doi.org/10.1001/archinte.160.18.2799

Schussel, K.E., Forbes, S., Taylor, A.M., & Cooley, J.H. (2019). Implementation of an Interprofessional Medication Therapy Management Experience. American journal of pharmaceutical education, 83(3), 6584. https://doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6584

Shenoy, A. (2021). Patient safety from the perspective of quality management frameworks: a review. Patient Safety in Surgery, 15(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13037-021-00286-6

Thomas, D. & Sousa, I., & Woods, D., & Herman, R., & Baker, D. (2018). Drug Information Training for Pharmacists. InClinical Pharmacy Education, Practice and Research, pp. 191-199. Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-814276-9.00013-1

Thomas, D., Cooper, J.C., & Maas, M. (2020). Neuron Model of Interprofessional Education and Evidence-Based Practice. Innovations in pharmacy, 11(3). https://doi.org/10.24926/iip.v11i3.3324

Van, C., Costa, D., Abbott, P., Mitchell, B., & Krass, I. (2012). Community pharmacist attitudes towards collaboration with general practitioners: development and validation of a measure and a model. BMC health services research, 12, 320. https://doi.org/10.1186/1472-6963-12-320

Vinluan, C.M., Jabalie, M.M., Navarrete, J.P., & Padilla, M. E. (2018). Evaluating the Types of Pharmacy Student Interventions Made During an Interprofessional 6-Week Adult Internal Medicine Rotation. Journal of pharmacy practice, 31(3), 298–303. https://doi.org/10.1177/0897190017707120

Wisniewski, C.S., Robert, S., & Ball, S. (2014). Collaboration between a drug information center and an academic detailing program. American journal of health-system pharmacy, 71(2), 128–133. https://doi.org/10.2146/ajhp130225

Downloads

Published

2022-08-30

How to Cite

Zachariah, S., Thomas, D., Mohamed, F., Chiraparambil, M., Soorya, A., Parveen, A., Singh, B., Gopakumar, A., & Baker, D. (2022). Agreement of medicine and pharmacy students on quality of drug information. Pharmacy Education, 22(1), p. 771–777. https://doi.org/10.46542/pe.2022.221.771777

Issue

Section

Research Article