Pharmacy students’ perceptions of social media in education

Authors

  • Andrew Mawdsley The University of Manchester

Keywords:

Social Media, Student Perceptions, Technology

Abstract

Introduction: This study measures students’ perceptions of social media in education, to consider how social media may be incorporated as a complementary learning tool.

Methodology: Undergraduate pharmacy students (n=623) took part in a survey to gauge their perceptions of social media in education. Data is analysed for emergent themes.

Evaluation: Thirty-four per cent (n=262) of the programme cohort responded. Six themes emerged from the data; privacy and confidentiality, access to technology, peer socialisation, enforcement of social media, acceptance of social media, and past experience. Ninety-two per cent of respondents reported actively using social media, nonetheless, fifty- seven per cent favour the University virtual learning environment in preference to social media for learning.

Future Work: Pharmacy students are active users of peer-mediated social media learning groups. However, students have reservations regarding online professionalism, and doubt the place of social media in education which includes the teacher. Desire for favourable perceptions on professionalism, and lack of experience with social media as a teaching method, negatively impacts the genuine use of social media for educational purposes. 

Author Biography

Andrew Mawdsley, The University of Manchester

Manchester Pharmacy School

References

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Published

2015-06-18

How to Cite

Mawdsley, A. (2015). Pharmacy students’ perceptions of social media in education. Pharmacy Education, 15. Retrieved from https://pharmacyeducation.fip.org/pharmacyeducation/article/view/346

Issue

Section

Research Article