Student Focus Groups as an Element of the MPharm Quality Management Programme

Authors

  • Michael H Sosabowski University of Brighton
  • Rachel Sawers University of Brighton
  • Anne-Marie Zohoui University of Brighton
  • Tina Burton University of Brighton
  • Sally Eynon University of Brighton
  • Louise Noble University of Brighton
  • Caroline Ansell University of Brighton
  • Catherine Murphy University of Brighton
  • Ajay Patel University of Brighton
  • Jayne Anne O'Conner University of Brighton
  • Gail Healey University of Brighton
  • Alison Penna University of Brighton
  • Kate Woodrow University of Brighton
  • Nadine Ryan University of Brighton
  • Jaimini Patel University of Brighton
  • Una McPartlan University of Brighton
  • Chris Aljawhiri University of Brighton
  • Sally Pearce University of Brighton
  • Sue Taylor University of Brighton
  • Anna Thorell University of Brighton
  • Vanessa Hill University of Brighton
  • Lynn Martin University of Brighton
  • Steven Bradley University of Brighton
  • Morgan Reidy University of Brighton
  • Tommy Butler University of Brighton
  • Diane-Marie Barton University of Brighton
  • Debbie Baker University of Brighton
  • John Fallon University of Brighton
  • Caroline Metters University of Brighton
  • Mary Boucher University of Brighton
  • Andew Jukes University of Brighton
  • Nick Reid University of Brighton
  • Jenny Hodgson University of Brighton
  • Emma Glover University of Brighton
  • Alice Goddard University of Brighton
  • George W J Olivier University of Brighton
  • Stephen P Denyer University of Brighton

Keywords:

Quality management, Focus group, Service providers, Respondent

Abstract

We report the successful introduction of student report focus groups (SFGS) as an element of our School of Pharmacy quality management programme. Student focus groups feature focused discussion, problem-solving and brainstorming, which allow students at each level of the Master of Pharmacy (MPharm) degree to contribute opinion, commentary, ideas and solutions to the School of Pharmacy (the School) and, in so doing, enhance their own and their colleagues’ education. Focus group outputs are formallyreported to the MPhann Course Board and the focus group facilitator closes the reporting loop by reporting Course Board decisions back to the SFG. The group facilitatormoderates meetings, and is a member of the teaching staff who has a pre-existingprofessional rela:tion.ship with the group. The School demonstrably benefits from inputs, while the group memttem benefit by gaining transferable skills. Group members also gain the opportunity to contribute to the School quality management and assessment process. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations are included which indicate that such groups provide a valuable contribution to the quality management programme of the School. The variety of ways in which the group membersand the whole student body benefit are described.

Author Biographies

Michael H Sosabowski, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Rachel Sawers, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Anne-Marie Zohoui, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Tina Burton, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Sally Eynon, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Louise Noble, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Caroline Ansell, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Catherine Murphy, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Ajay Patel, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Jayne Anne O'Conner, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Gail Healey, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Kate Woodrow, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Nadine Ryan, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Jaimini Patel, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Una McPartlan, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Chris Aljawhiri, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Sally Pearce, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Sue Taylor, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Anna Thorell, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Vanessa Hill, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Lynn Martin, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Steven Bradley, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Morgan Reidy, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Tommy Butler, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Diane-Marie Barton, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Debbie Baker, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

John Fallon, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Caroline Metters, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Mary Boucher, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Andew Jukes, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Nick Reid, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Jenny Hodgson, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Emma Glover, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Alice Goddard, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

George W J Olivier, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Stephen P Denyer, University of Brighton

School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Published

01/01/2000

Issue

Section

Research Article