Pharmacists’ views of preceptorship

Authors

  • Jennifer Marriott Monash University, 381 Royal Pde, Parkville, Vic. 3052
  • Kirstie Galbraith Monash University, 381 Royal Pde, Parkville, Vic. 3052
  • Susan Taylor The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006
  • Lisa Dalton University of Tasmania, Launceston, Tasmania 7250
  • Miranda Rose La Trobe University, Bundoora, Vic. 3086
  • Rosalind Bull University of Tasmania, Launceston, Tasmania 7250
  • Anna Leversha Monash University, Traralgon, Vic. 3844
  • Dawn Best
  • Helen Howarth University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania 7001
  • Maree Simpson Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW 2678

Keywords:

Pharmacist, Pharmacist Preceptor, Preceptor, Preceptor Education

Abstract

Aims: To determine rural pharmacists’ attitudes towards being a preceptor.

Methods: A survey was undertaken before pharmacists commenced a preceptor education program. Pharmacist’s rated their attitudes and abilities as a preceptor using a 5-point Likert scale. Qualitative data from open-ended questions was analysed for themes.

Results: The pharmacists’ rating of their attitudes and abilities as a preceptor is presented as a mean score. The themes identified from open-ended questions included: reasons for being a preceptor; benefits and rewards of the preceptor role; challenges; personal strengths and weaknesses.

Conclusion: Pharmacist preceptors have a similar view of their role to preceptors in other professions. They identify a number of rewards of precepting and are aware of their limitations in the role. Awareness that these limitations can impact on the success of the learning experience led pharmacists to undertake the online Australian Pharmacy Preceptor Education Program.

Author Biographies

Jennifer Marriott, Monash University, 381 Royal Pde, Parkville, Vic. 3052

Department of Pharmacy Practice, Victorian College of Pharmacy

Kirstie Galbraith, Monash University, 381 Royal Pde, Parkville, Vic. 3052

Department of Pharmacy Practice, Victorian College of Pharmacy

Susan Taylor, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006

Faculty of Pharmacy

Lisa Dalton, University of Tasmania, Launceston, Tasmania 7250

University Department of Rural Health

Miranda Rose, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Vic. 3086

School of Human Communication Sciences

Rosalind Bull, University of Tasmania, Launceston, Tasmania 7250

University Department of Rural Health

Anna Leversha, Monash University, Traralgon, Vic. 3844

School of Rural Health

Dawn Best

Education Consultant

Helen Howarth, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania 7001

School of Pharmacy

Maree Simpson, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW 2678

School of Biomedical Sciences

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Published

01/06/2006

Issue

Section

Research Article