PROGRAMME DESCRIPTION: Virtual APPE grand rounds: A learning activity to enhance remote rotations during the COVID-19 pandemic

Authors

  • Troy Kish Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, United States https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7393-8097
  • Suzanna Gim Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, United States https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6354-5196
  • Antony Pham Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, United States
  • Jaclyn Cusumano Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, United States
  • Eric Ocheretyaner Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, United States
  • Elaena Quattrocchi Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, United States https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6451-4455
  • Lana Hareez Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, United States https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6086-018X
  • Mandy Chen Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, United States
  • Roda Plakogiannis Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, United States

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.46542/pe.2021.211.651655

Keywords:

Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience, COVID-19, Presentation, Remote learning

Abstract

Context: To assess students’ perception of a virtual learning activity developed for a remote Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) during the peak of the coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) outbreak in New York City.

Description of course: Due to the pandemic, many clinical APPEs were converted to remote elective experiences during the final 5-week rotation block (from 1 April to 6 May 2020). A small group of faculty developed and piloted a virtual learning activity (APPE grand rounds) to enhance learning in this setting. Students assigned to participating faculty were tasked to develop 60 to 90-minute presentations scheduled two to three times weekly for large synchronous e-learning experiences across various simultaneous rotations.

Evaluation: A questionnaire consisting of nine items utilising a 5-point Likert scale was developed and administered to assess student perception of the virtual format, presentation skills, and overall satisfaction with the experience. 

Author Biographies

Troy Kish, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, United States

Arnold and Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

Suzanna Gim, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, United States

Arnold and Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

Antony Pham, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, United States

Arnold and Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

Jaclyn Cusumano, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, United States

Arnold and Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

Eric Ocheretyaner, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, United States

Arnold and Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

Elaena Quattrocchi, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, United States

Arnold and Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

Lana Hareez, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, United States

Arnold and Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

Mandy Chen, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, United States

Arnold and Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

Roda Plakogiannis, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, United States

Arnold and Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

References

Al-Dahir, S., Bryant, K., Kennedy, K. B., & Robinson, D. S. (2014). Online Virtual-Patient Cases Versus Traditional Problem-Based Learning in Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 78(4), 76. https://doi.org/10.5688/ajpe78476

Flowers, S. K., Vanderbush, R. E., Hastings, J. K., & West, D. (2010). Web-based Multimedia Vignettes in Advanced Community Pharmacy Practice Experiences. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 74(3), 39. https://doi.org/10.5688/aj740339

Lean QY, Ming LC, Wong YY, Neoh CF, Farooqui M, & Muhsain SNF. (2020). Online versus classroom learning in pharmacy education: Students’ preference and readiness. Pharmacy Education, 20(1),19-27. Available at: https://pharmacyeducation.fip.org/pharmacyeducation/article/view/789

Phillips, J. A. (2015). Replacing traditional live lectures with online learning modules: Effects on learning and student perceptions. Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning, 7(6), 738-744. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cptl.2015.08.009

Porter, A. L., Pitterle, M. E., & Hayney, M. S. (2014). Comparison of Online Versus Classroom Delivery of an Immunization Elective Course. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 78(5), 96. https://doi/org/10.5688/ajpe78596

Salter, S. M., Karia, A., Sanfilippo, F. M., & Clifford, R. M. (2014). Effectiveness of E-learning in Pharmacy Education. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 78(4), 83. https://doi.org/10.5688/ajpe78483

Published

11/11/2021

Issue

Section

Programme Description