Teaching Pharmacy students how to manage effectively in a highly competitive environment

Authors

  • Judith A Singleton School of Pharmacy, University of Queensland & Asia Pacific Centre for Sustainable Enterprise, Griffith Business School, Griffith University
  • Lisa M Nissen School of Clinical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology

Abstract

Aims: To evaluate if a revamped business management course for 4th year undergraduate pharmacy students had achieved the course aims of not only improving pharmacy students’ perceived understanding of pharmacy business management topics but also increasing their confidence in their business management knowledge and skills.

Background: Student feedback from previous years had indicated that the cohort had struggled to translate theoretical business management concepts learned in the classroom into practice in the workplace. To address this problem the course has been changed to a ‘flipped classroom’ format with face-to-face time focusing on case-based scenarios and interactive classroom discussion with some role plays.

Method: Both course assessment throughout the semester and a student survey informed the evaluation process.

Results: After completing the course, students felt they had increased their knowledge of business management concepts but many indicated that they lacked the confidence to undertake basic management functions.

Conclusions: Further course restructuring is required with a greater focus on skills development. 

Author Biographies

Judith A Singleton, School of Pharmacy, University of Queensland & Asia Pacific Centre for Sustainable Enterprise, Griffith Business School, Griffith University

Lecturer, Quality Use of Medicines, School of Pharmacy 

Lisa M Nissen, School of Clinical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology

Head oif School of Clinical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology

References

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Milman, N.B. (2012) The Flipped Classroom Strategy: What Is it and How Can it Best be Used? Distance Learning, 9(3), 85-87.

Moultry, A.M. (2011) A Mass Merchandiser’s Role in Enhancing Pharmacy Students’ Business Plan Development Skills for Medication Therapy Management Services. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 75(7), Article 133.

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Porras, J.I. & Anderson, B. (1981) Improving managerial effectiveness through modeling-based training. Organizational Dynamics, 9(4), 60-77.

Singleton, J.A. & Nissen, L.M. (in press). Future-proofing the pharmacy profession in a hypercompetitive market. Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy.

Published

01/01/2014

Issue

Section

Research Article