Introducing novel learning methods to a pharmacy school in Japan: A preliminary analysis

Authors

  • Isao Saito School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa University, Shinagawa, Tokyo, Japan
  • Mari Kogo School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa University, Shinagawa, Tokyo, Japan
  • Keiko Sasaki School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa University, Shinagawa, Tokyo, Japan
  • Hitoshi Satao School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa University, Shinagawa, Tokyo, Japan
  • Yuji Kiuchi School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa University, Shinagawa, Tokyo, Japan
  • Toshinori Yamamoto School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa University, Shinagawa, Tokyo, Japan

Keywords:

Pharmacy education, problem-based learning, tutorial small group discussion, efficacy analysis, Japan

Abstract

Problem-based learning (PBL) and small group discussions (SGD) have gained the attention of many Japanese pharmacy schools as a new education tool. However, the effectiveness of these methods may be influenced by students’ attitudes and culture. This paper describes how a School of Pharmacy in Japan has been piloting PBL and tutorial SGD sessions and reports results of a preliminary analysis of their efficacy as educational tools. The results showed that PBL and tutorial SGD could be valuable educational tools for Japanese pharmacy schools. Further research is suggested in order to confirm these results.

References

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Issue

Section

Research Article