Top 200 prescribed drugs as a tool for pharmacy teaching and training

Authors

  • Win Winit-Watjana Practice and Policy, Department of Pharmacy, Health and Well-being, Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of Sunderland, Wharncliffe Street, Sunderland, SR1 3SD, UK
  • Deanne Francis Practice and Policy, Department of Pharmacy, Health and Well-being, Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of Sunderland, Wharncliffe Street, Sunderland, SR1 3SD, UK
  • Hui M. Ho Practice and Policy, Department of Pharmacy, Health and Well-being, Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of Sunderland, Wharncliffe Street, Sunderland, SR1 3SD, UK

Keywords:

educational tool, pharmacy teaching, pharmacy training, top 200 prescribed drugs

Abstract

Pharmacy students and pharmacists need to have in-depth knowledge of prescribed drugs to provide effective pharmacy services. This study aimed to develop a list of the UK‟s top 200 prescribed drugs with relevant details and to elicit students‟ perceptions of its format and usefulness. The drug list was devised using the Prescription Cost Analyses 2006 and 2007, and the students‟ opinions were gathered from a focus group of nine Level-4 MPharm students. The results showed that 115 drugs in the list (57.5%) were prescribed as generics, and three most commonly prescribed therapeutic classes were found in the central nervous system (28.5%), cardiovascular system (21.0%) and infections (9.5%). The focus group found the drug list was applicable to pharmacy education and training, and it should be in form of a booklet for quick reference. Further studies are required to assess the use of the drug list in practice.

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Issue

Section

Research Article