Promotion and enhancement of communication and discussion skills through clinical pharmacy courses taught in English at a Japanese School of Pharmacy

Authors

  • Eiichi Akaho Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences and the Center for Area Research and Development, Kobe Gakuin University, Kobe, Japan.
  • Sari Nakagawa Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences and the Center for Area Research and Development, Kobe Gakuin University, Kobe, Japan.
  • Michael Katz Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, College of Pharmacy, University of Arizona, Tucson Arizona

Keywords:

Communication skill, small group discussion, facilitator, clinical pharmacy, Japanese pharmacy

Abstract

In 2006, the Japanese pharmacy education system shifted from a 4-year to a 6-year curriculum. One of the major emphases of the new 6-year pharmacy curriculum is patient-centered clinical pharmacy, and it is expected that the students will leave the program with good communication skills not only with other health professionals but also with patients. Teaching pharmacy students to become excellent communicators is no easy task, and in the previous 4-year Japanese pharmacy curriculum, pharmacy practice and communication skills were deemphasized in favor of basic science, laboratory practice and research skills. One strategy to enhance students’ communication and critical thinking skills is the use of small group discussions and case-based learning. We evaluated the impact of a small group case-based discussion in a group of pharmacy students in Japan.Students’ motivation to learn clinical pharmacy and their perceptions of the importance of learning communication skills were evaluated. After the session, most students felt that they should receive more training in clinical pharmacy and communication.

References

Abusabha, R., Peacock, J., & Achterberg, C. (1999). How to make nutrition education more meaningful through facilitated group discussions. Journal of the American Dietetic Association,99(1), 72-76.

Allen, M., Sargeant, J., Mann, K., Fleming, M., & Premi, J. (2003). Videoconferencing for practice-based small-group continuing medical education: feasibility, acceptability, effectiveness, and cost. The Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions, 23(1), 38-47.

Bentley, J. P., Stroup, L. J., Wilkin, N. E., & Bouldin, A. S. (2005). Patient evaluations of pharmacist performance with variations on attire and communication levels. J. Am. Pharm. Assoc., 45, 600-607.

Brodie, D. C. (1966). The Challenge to pharmacy in times of challenge, Washington D.C. the commission on pharmaceutical services to ambulant patients by hospitals and related facilities. The Am. Pharm. Assoc. & Am. Soc. Hosp. Pharm., 39.

Carlisl, E. C., & Ibbotson, T. (2005). Introducing problem-based learning into research methods teaching: student and facilitator evaluation. Nurse Education Today, 25(7), 527-541.

Carlisle, C., Cooper, H., & Watkins, C. (2004). "Do none of you talk to each other?": the challenges facing the implementation of interprofessional education. Medical Teacher, 26(6), 545-552.

Coleman, C. L. (2003). Examining influences of pharmacists’ communication with consumers about antibiotics. Health communication, 15(1), 79-99.

Gelula, M. H. (1997). Clinical discussion sessions and small groups. Surgical Neurology, 47(4), 399-402.

Hargie, D. W., Morrow, N. C., & Woodman, C. (2000). Pharmacists’ evaluation of key communication skills in practice. Patient Education and Counseling, 39, 61-70.Johnston, A. K., & Tinning, R. S. (2001). Meeting the challenge of problem-based learning: developing the facilitators. Nurse Education Today, 21(3), 161-169.

Jones, C. (2001). Sociodrama: a teaching method for expanding the understanding of clinical issues. Journal of Palliative Medicine, 4(3), 386-390.

Kam, W. J., Jong, B. M., Tromp, F. J., Moorman, P. W., & Lei, J. (2001). Effects of electronic communication between the GP and the pharmacist. Thequality of medication data on admission and after discharge. Family Practice, 18(6), 605-609.

Mckinley, C. J., & Stoll, W. R. (1994). A method of improving student learning in physiology: the small group workshop. Advances in Physiology Education,266, 16-23.

Mckinley, C. J., & William, R. S. (1994). A method of improving student learning in physiology: the small group workshop. Adv. Physiol. Educ.,11 (1), 16-23.

Moutel, G.., Duchange, N., Francois, R., Shrara, L. I., Theodorou, I., Noel, V., Montgolfier, S. D., Callies, I., Bricaire, F., Herve, C., Leport, C., & The APOCO-COPOLOTE Study Group. (2005). Communication of pharmacogenetic research results to HIV treated patients: standpoints of professionals and patients.13, 1055-1062.

Nilaward, W., Mason, H. L., & Newton, G. D. (2005). Community pharmacist-child medication communication: magnitude, influence, and content. J. Am. Pharm. Assoc., 45(3), 345-362.

Norwood, G. J. (1975). Impact of a clinical pharmacist’s emphasis on patient communication on the patient’s attitude toward pharmacy. Drug Intell. Clin. Pharm., 9, 601-604.

Parker, P. F. (1967). The people. Am. J. Hosp. Pharm., 24, 351-355.Rising, L. W. (1946). Am. J. Pharm. Edu., 10, 557-559.

Sommers, L. S., Morgan, L., Johnson, L., & Yatabe, K. (2006). Practice Inquiry: Clinical Uncertainty as a focus for small-group learning and practice improvement. Society of General Internal Medicine, 22, 246-252.

Sommers, L. S., Morgan, L., Johnson, L., & Yatabe, K. (2007). Practice inquiry: clinical uncertainty as a focus for small-group learning and practice improvement. J. Gen. Intern. Med., 22, 246-252.

Wagner, P. J., Lentz, L., & Heslop, S. D. (2002). Teaching communication skills: a skills-based approach. Academic Medicine, 77(11), 1164.

Wuenschell, C. W., Dalrymple, K. R., & Shuler, C. F. (2007). PBL Core Skills Faculty Development Workshop 2: Training Faculty in Group Learning Facilitation Skills through Role-Modeling and Role-Play Activities. Journal of Dental Education,71(5), 606-618.

Youngken, H.W .(1953). The Washington experience-clinical pharmacy. Am.J. Pharm. Edu., 17(1), 64-70

Issue

Section

Research Article