Student feedback on structured large group learning sessions in Pharmacology in a medical school in Nepal

Authors

  • Dr. P. Ravi Shankar MD Dept. of Clinical Pharmacology, KIST Medical College , P.O. Box 14142, Kathmandu, Nepal
  • Ms. Nisha Jha Dept. of Clinical Pharmacology, KIST Medical College , P.O. Box 14142, Kathmandu, Nepal
  • Ms. Omi Bajracharya MPharm Dept. of Clinical Pharmacology, KIST Medical College , P.O. Box 14142, Kathmandu, Nepal
  • Ms. Rojeena K. Shrestha Dept. of Clinical Pharmacology, KIST Medical College , P.O. Box 14142, Kathmandu, Nepal
  • Mr. Harish S. Thapa MPharm Dept. of Clinical Pharmacology, KIST Medical College , P.O. Box 14142, Kathmandu, Nepal

Keywords:

Large group teaching, Lectures, Nepal, Pharmacology

Abstract

Background: The department of Clinical Pharmacology at KIST Medical College, Lalitpur, Nepal has introduced structured, large group interactive sessions.
Aims: The present study was carried out to obtain student feedback about the educational innovation.
Methods: A questionnaire was administered to first year students during May 2009 after obtaining written informed consent. The agreement of students with a set of twenty-five questions using a modified Likert-type scale was noted. Free text comments were invited.
Results: All 75 students participated. Majority were male, self-financing and educated in private schools. The total median score was 95 (maximum 125) and was higher among female students, students from outside the Kathmandu valley but from a non- remote area, and students educated in private schools. Students wanted more information about which books to read, more frequent revision sessions and copies of lecture slides.
Conclusion: The overall student opinion was positive. We plan to continue and further develop structured large group interactive teaching.

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Issue

Section

Research Article