Pharmacy Students’ Perceptions of Their Curriculum and Profession: Implications for Pharmacy Education

Authors

  • Flora Keshishian Coordinator, Interpersonal Communication for the Pharmacist, Department of Rhetoric, Communication and Theatre, St. John’s College, St. John's University, 8000 Utopia Parkway, Queens, NY 11439
  • Barrett P. Brenton Associate Professor, Department of Sociology & Anthropology, St. John’s College, St. John's University, 8000 Utopia Parkway, Queens, NY 11439

Keywords:

Pharmacy majors, Pharmacy curriculum, Pharmacy Profession, Qualitative study, Student perception

Abstract

Objective: This qualitative study described and analyzed pharmacy students’ perceptions of their major and profession.
Methods: One hundred and forty-seven students responded to an open-ended question asking them to state their least appealing reason for majoring in pharmacy. The sample consisted of undergraduate freshmen and sophomore pharmacy majors enrolled in a speech course.
Results: Comments reflecting the least appealing reason for majoring in pharmacy were grouped into two major themes. Seventy six percent of student comments related to the Degree/Pharmacy Curriculum, and 24% to Beyond Degree/Pharmacy Profession. The first theme was divided into four sub-themes: Heavy Workload (55%); Time Constraints (42%); Expense (13%); and General Curriculum Issues (9%). The second theme included the following sub-themes: Negative Work Environment (49%); Boring (32%); Not Quite an MD (14%); and Lack of Empathy (11%).
Conclusion: Findings of this study provide further recommendations for making adjustments in pharmacy education/curriculum as well as insight into more effective recruiting strategies and retention.

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Issue

Section

Research Article