Influence of student characteristics on satisfaction with pharmacy course.

Authors

  • Rita Laaksonen Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY.
  • I Gunasekaran Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY.
  • R Holland Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY.
  • J Leung Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY.
  • A Patel Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY.
  • J Shah Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY.

Keywords:

National student survey, Pre-registration students, Satisfaction, Undergraduate students

Abstract

Objectives: To describe how characteristics of newly graduated pharmacy students may influence their perceptions of, and satisfactions with, an undergraduate pharmacy course.Methods: In 2007, a piloted postal questionnaire based on the National Student Survey (NSS), which is administered to final year undergraduate students in all universities in England and Northern Ireland and in some in Scotland and Wales, was sent to all 98 pharmacy pre-registration students who had newly graduated from a UK university.Results: A response rate of 52% was achieved; 84% of the respondents were satisfied with the quality of the course. Characteristics, such as reasons for choosing to study pharmacy and selecting the university, country of origin and language background influenced satisfaction.Conclusion: Characteristics may influence students’satisfaction with an undergraduate pharmacy course; further research is required into how the expectations of students may be managed and courses enhanced.

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Issue

Section

Research Article