Smoking cessation education in Thai schools of pharmacy

Authors

  • Piyarat Nimitakpong Department of Pharmacy Practice, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok, Thailand and Center of Pharmaceutical Outcome Research (CPOR), Naresuan University, Phitsanulok, Thailand
  • Nathorn Chaiyakunapruk Department of Pharmacy Practice, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok, Thailand and Center of Pharmaceutical Outcome Research (CPOR), Naresuan University, Phitsanulok, Thailand and School of Population Health, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
  • Teerpon Dhippayom Department of Pharmacy Practice, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok, Thailand and Pharmaceutical Care Research Unit, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok, Thailand

Keywords:

Pharmacy education, pharmacy student, smoking, smoking cessation education, tobacco cessation education

Abstract

Pharmacy graduates are expected to have adequate training about smoking cessation. This study aimed to determine the extent of smoking cessation content provided in Thai pharmacy schools. A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to all pharmacy schools in Thailand. Head of schools were asked to distribute the questionnaire to faculty members who taught topics related to smoking cessation. Course descriptions in the current curriculum of all pharmacy undergraduate programs were reviewed. All 12 schools of pharmacy responded to the questionnaires. A median time spent on all topics was 198 minutes. The most heavily emphasized topics were health effects of smoking, counseling techniques, and smoking cessation aids. Main barriers were limited teaching time and a lack of clerkship sites focusing on smoking cessation services. Only one school has their course description contained the words related to smoking cessation. These findings suggested a more standardized and effective smoking cessation education for Thai pharmacy students. 

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Issue

Section

Research Article