The use of human patient simulators for teaching UK pharmacy students about critical care

Authors

  • A. Reape School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Portsmouth, St Michaels Building, White Swan Rd, Portsmouth, Hants, PO1 2DT
  • C. Lips-Nassif ExPERT Centre of Excellence in Teaching and Learning, University of Portsmouth
  • L. Bailey ExPERT Centre of Excellence in Teaching and Learning, University of Portsmouth
  • P. Ashwell ExPERT Centre of Excellence in Teaching and Learning, University of Portsmouth
  • D. Brown School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Portsmouth, St Michaels Building, White Swan Rd, Portsmouth, Hants, PO1 2DT

Keywords:

Human patient simulator, critical care, undergraduate

Abstract

Background
The use of human patient simulators (HPSs) has not been studied extensively in UK pharmacy undergraduate curriculums.
Aims
To research the validity of incorporating simulation into the UK MPharm and to appraise its ability to enhance the learning process in critical care teaching.
Method
A controlled, small-group, pilot study of critical care teaching of drug overdose situations was carried out using a HPS, with UK undergraduate pharmacy students at Stage 3 of their 4-year undergraduate course.
Results
HPS sessions involving digoxin and morphine improved both immediate and medium-term knowledge in most cases; improvements were not appreciably different from a conventional tutorial method. Students appeared to derive greater benefit from more than one session, probably due to increasing familiarity with the HPS and associated environment. Feedback was markedly enthusiastic for this new way of teaching.
Conclusion
HPS teaching to pharmacy undergraduates is worth investigating further.

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Issue

Section

Research Article