The Value of Example Solutions in Pharmacy Education: The role of seniority and gender

Authors

  • Albin Sandelin The Bioinformatics Centre, Department of Biology & Biotech Research and Innovation Centre, University of Copenhagen, Ole Maaloes vej 5, DK-2200, Denmark
  • Helle Rüsz Hansen Department of Pharmaceutics and Analytical Chemistry, Universitetsparken 2 DK-2100 København Ø
  • Stefania Baldursdottir Department of Pharmaceutics and Analytical Chemistry, Universitetsparken 2 DK-2100 København Ø
  • Anders Skov Kristensen Department of Medical Chemistry, Universitetsparken 2, 2100 København Ø Denmark
  • Lasse K. Bak Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, Universitetsparken 2, DK-2100 København Ø Denmark
  • Frederik Voetman Christiansen Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, Universitetsparken 2, DK-2100 København Ø Denmark
  • Christine Selhuber-Unkel The Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 København Ø, Denmark and Department of Zoophysiology, Institute of Zoology, University of Kiel, D-24098 Kiel, Germany.

Keywords:

Example solution, deep learning, gender

Abstract

Background: Example solutions to problem sets and exams are provided in the majority of pharmacy courses at the University
of Copenhagen.
Aims: Since the impact and usage of examples solutions are unknown, we wanted to evaluate the positive and negative aspects of the usage of example solutions as an educational tool-.
Method: 164 Danish pharmacy program students answered a questionnaire and answers were analyzed using non-parametric tests.
Results: We found that example solutions encourage deep learning strategies among students. Furthermore, the study identified significant differences in the students‟ self-assessment of preparation level prior to classes depending on gender. Male students feel as well prepared as female students despite spending significantly less time in preparation.
Conclusion: This study shows that example solutions are mostly used by students to follow a deep learning strategy, but that it is essential to properly introduce the students to the intended usage of the example solutions.

References

Ramsden, P. (1992a). Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Routledge.

Biggs, J. and Tang, C. (2007). Teaching for Quality Learning at University. Berkshire: Open University Press.

Marton, F. and Booth, S. (1997). Learning and Awareness. NewJersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Ramsden, P. (1992b). Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Routledge. pp. 53-60.

Ramsden, P. (1992c). Learning to Teach in Higher Education. London: Routledge. pp. 51.

Ihaka, R. and Gentleman, R. (1996). R: A Language for Data Analysis and Graphics. Journal of Computational and Graphical Statistics 5:299-314.

Bang Jakobsen, L. and Johannsen, B. F. (2009). Didactical Contract: An Analytical Concept to facilitate Successful Implementation of Alternative Physics Labs. ESERA conference, Istanbul, Turkey.

Serker, D. (2008) . Lattice: Multivariate Data Visualization with R. New York: Springer.

Issue

Section

Research Article