Evidence-based OTC “Prescribing”—A New Postgraduate Course at the Auckland School of Pharmacy

Authors

  • J. Sheridan The School of Pharmacy, The University of Auckland, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand
  • J. Shaw The School of Pharmacy, The University of Auckland, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand
  • D. Hancox The School of Pharmacy, The University of Auckland, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand

Keywords:

ommunity pharmacy, Evidence-based medicine, Over-the-counter, Prescribing, Postgraduate

Abstract

The School of Pharmacy at the University of Auckland has recently developed a taught postgraduate course, evidence-based over-the-counter (OTC) prescribing, aimed specifically at community pharmacists and designed to develop the skills required to practise evidence-based medicine (EBM) utilising OTC “pre- scribing” as the vehicle for learning. The course forms an optional part of the postgraduate pharmacy programme available at the University of Auckland including PGCert/PGDip/Masters of Pharmacy Practice programmes and is designed to build on a compulsory course in clinical skills. This report describes the course objectives, course structure and assessments. Views of students are also presented.

References

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Published

2003-06-03

How to Cite

Sheridan, J., Shaw, J., & Hancox, D. (2003). Evidence-based OTC “Prescribing”—A New Postgraduate Course at the Auckland School of Pharmacy. Pharmacy Education, 3(3). Retrieved from https://pharmacyeducation.fip.org/pharmacyeducation/article/view/37

Issue

Section

Research Article