Design and implementation of an integrated medication management curriculum in an entry-to-practice doctor of pharmacy program

Authors

  • Peter Shane Loewen The University of British Columbia http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7160-6438
  • Patricia Gerber University of British Columbia
  • James McCormack University of British Columbia
  • Glenda MacDonald University of British Columbia

Keywords:

Clinical, Curriculum Design, Implementation, Integration, Medication Management, Pharmacy

Abstract

Introduction: The design and implementation of the core patient care curriculum (medication management [MM]) in a new Canadian entry-to-practice doctor of pharmacy programme is described.

Curriculum Design: The MM curriculum was designed to span the first three years of the programme and comprise 75% of the programme’s coursework. The goal was to achieve "multi-disciplinary" integration of pharmaceutical and clinical sciences. Seventeen modules were created, within which medical conditions were the main unit of organisation. For each condition, the "elements" (or themes) most relevant for pharmacists to develop the knowledge and skills necessary for its management were identified. A quarter of curricular time was dedicated to integration activities (IA) created for students to elaborate and integrate their knowledge and demonstrate competency. The curriculum and IA incorporated a spiral progression of complexity and level of performance across year levels, guided by a programme- level cognitive model.

Evaluation: Approaches to overcoming challenges identified through pilot-testing, faculty, student, and stakeholder feedback are described. 

Author Biographies

Peter Shane Loewen, The University of British Columbia

Assistant Professor

Pharmacotherapetuic Specialist, Medicine

Patricia Gerber, University of British Columbia

Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

James McCormack, University of British Columbia

Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

Glenda MacDonald, University of British Columbia

Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

References

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Published

24/09/2016

Issue

Section

Research Article