Engaging undergraduate pharmacy students in community action: The 20 is Plenty campaign

Authors

  • Pauline Norris University of Otago
  • Aynsley Peterson University of Otago
  • Jing Bian University of Otago
  • Prajakta Lawande University of Otago
  • Gahee Lee University of Otago
  • Ashley Neoh University of Otago
  • Abigaiil Paul University of Otago
  • Harumi Tanimura University of Otago

Keywords:

Pharmacy education, community action, public health, New Zealand

Abstract

In order to avoid high prescription costs to patients, individuals and families are exempt from prescription charges after paying for 20 items in one year. This paper reports on a community action project where a group of students designed, implemented and evaluated a campaign to raise awareness of this exemption. 

Author Biographies

Pauline Norris, University of Otago

Professor of Social Pharmacy - School of Pharmacy

Aynsley Peterson, University of Otago

Professional Practice Fellow - School of Pharmacy

Jing Bian, University of Otago

BPharm student - School of Pharmacy

Prajakta Lawande, University of Otago

BPharm student - School of Pharmacy

Gahee Lee, University of Otago

BPharm student - School of Pharmacy

Ashley Neoh, University of Otago

BPharm student - School of Pharmacy

Abigaiil Paul, University of Otago

BPharm student - School of Pharmacy

Harumi Tanimura, University of Otago

BPharm student - School of Pharmacy

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Published

28/03/2018

Issue

Section

Research Article