Research on social skills before and after practical training of pharmaceutical students

Authors

  • Nobuyuki Wakui Hoshi University, Tokyo
  • Shunsuke Shirozu Hoshi University, Tokyo
  • Miho Yamamura Hoshi University, Tokyo
  • Kazuhiro Torigoe Hoshi University, Tokyo
  • Kazumi Ishituka Hoshi University, Tokyo
  • Yoshiaki Matida Hoshi University, Tokyo
  • Shotaro Sakurai Hoshi University, Tokyo

Keywords:

Kikuchi’s Scale of Social Skills-18, Pharmacy Education, Practical Training, Social Skills

Abstract

Background: Social and self-management skills for communicating, and acting in ways that build smooth interpersonal relationships with patients are required in clinical settings. We evaluated pharmacy students’ acquisition of social and self-management skills after their practical training.

Methods: We conducted a pre– and post-training survey with 85 pharmacy students (5th graders), using Kikuchi’s Scale of Social Skills-18 (KiSS-18) questionnaire and analysed them. We also evaluated whether students acquired the same skills even though training facilities differed.

Results: After practical training, KiSS-18 total scores significantly increased, from 55.2 ± 10.5 to 60.5 ± 11.3 (p<0.001). Total scores differed depending on whether training facilities were independent or chain pharmacies.

Conclusion: Students’ social skills materially improved, but the degree of improvement varied depending on the training facility. Grasping differences between facilities and ensuring that appropriate practice can be conducted is necessary. 

Author Biographies

Nobuyuki Wakui, Hoshi University, Tokyo

Division of Applied Pharmaceutical Education and Research

Shunsuke Shirozu, Hoshi University, Tokyo

Division of Applied Pharmaceutical Education and Research

Miho Yamamura, Hoshi University, Tokyo

Division of Applied Pharmaceutical Education and Research

Kazuhiro Torigoe, Hoshi University, Tokyo

Division of Applied Pharmaceutical Education and Research

Kazumi Ishituka, Hoshi University, Tokyo

Division of Applied Pharmaceutical Education and Research

Yoshiaki Matida, Hoshi University, Tokyo

Division of Applied Pharmaceutical Education and Research

Shotaro Sakurai, Hoshi University, Tokyo

Division of Applied Pharmaceutical Education and Research

References

Abe S. & Motomura N. (2008). Evaluation of social skills of trainees in occupational therapy program at clinical training: the use of KiSS-18. Oosakakyoikukiyou, 57, 41-47.

Cerulli J. & Briceland L.L. (2004). A streamlined training program for community pharmacy advanced practice preceptors to enable optimal experiential learning opportunities. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 68, 1-8

Cleland J., Bailey K., McLachlan S., McVey L. & Edwards R. (2007). Supplementary pharmacist prescribers’ views about communication skills teaching and learning, and applying these new skills in practice. International Journal of Pharmacy Practice, 15, 101-104.

Eguchi N. (2013). The trend of public perception of healthcare in japan - from the 4th perception survey of Japanese healthcare. Japan Medical Association Journal, 56, 267-274.

Fujino Y., Muroya K. & Sati K. (2005). Interpersonal relationships experienced in college life and development of social skills. Journal of University of Occupational and Environmental Health, 27, 263-272.

Goldstein A.P., Sprafkin R.P., Gershaw N.J. & Klein, P. (1979). Skill streaming the adolescent: a structured learning approach to teaching prosocial skills. Research Pr Pub, Champaign.

Hayashi, M., Arakida M. & Ohashi K. (2011). The effectiveness of a sex education program facilitating social skills for people with intellectual disability in Japan. Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 36, 11-19.

Hermansen C.J. & Wiederholt J.B. (2001). Pharmacist- patient relationship development in an ambulatory clinic setting. Health Communication, 13, 307-325.

Honda Y., Nagano A., Takashima M. & Yokoo T. (2015). Examination of social skills in physical therapy practice– the use of KiSS-18. Rigakuryohouhukuoka, 28, 80-82.

Kikuchi A. (2007). Shakaiteki Skill o Hakaru, In KiSS-18 Hand Book Kawashima Shoten, Tokyo.

Mao X. & Daibo I. (2008). Comparison of Chinese and Japanese university students in the contents of social skills. The Japanese Journal of Interpersonal Social Psychology, 8, 123-128.

Marriott J., Taylor S., Simpson M., Bull R., Galbraith K., Howarth H., Leversha A., Best D. & Rose M. (2005). Australian national strategy for pharmacy preceptor education and support. Australian Journal of Rural Health, 13, 83-90

Takashima N., Hinotsu A., Koike H., Yano I., Suzuki K. & Akazawa Y. (2004). The process of acquiring nursing performance abilities and social skills by new recruits during the first 12 months: an analysis based on self- evaluation. Journal of

Japan Academy of Nursing Education, 13, 1-16.

Teramachi H., Komada N., Shiga H., Tamura K. & Tsuchiya T. (2011). Development of scale for measuring pharmacists’ skill in communicating with cancer patients. Japanese Journal of Pharmaceutical Health Care and Sciences, 37,

-660.

Teramachi H., Komada N., Tanizawa K., Kuzuya Y. & Tsuchiya T. (2011). Development of skill scale for communication skill measurement of pharmacist. Yakugaku Zasshi, 131, 587-595.

The Law on Securing Quality, Efficacy and Safety of Products Including Pharmaceuticals and Medical device,. (1960). Law number: Act No. 145 of 1960

The Pharmaceutical Society of Japan. (2016). Available at: http://www.pharm.or.jp/kyoiku/pdf/ corecurri_briefing 4.pdf#search. Accessed 10th November, 2016.

Ueno, E. (2005). Development of the patients-nurse communication skill scale. Japan Journal of Nursing Science, 25, 47-55.

Published

12/09/2017

Issue

Section

Research Article